50 Ways to Define “Missional” – VII

Blues Brothers:  On the Missio Dei. I’ve been doing a series examining the posts from the collection of definitions in the recent missional synchroblog in which I participated with a total of 50 bloggers (plus a few unofficial entries). This exercise is perhaps becoming a bit of an appendix to the missional series I did last summer, doing an extensive consideration of the term.

With so few posts left in the queue (at least relatively speaking), we pick up the review once more with Ron Cole. He writes, “To understand ‘Missional’, is to immerse ourselves in the reality of the gospels and rediscover that Jesus’ church lived in the world and practiced an outrageous and scandalous table fellowship.” Continuing along the theme in John’s gospel and the synoptics, he says, “Whom you eat with defines whom you won’t eat with. With Jesus it never appears to be a ‘social’ program…it is radical, scandalous, outrageous…it’s the Kingdom.” He sums up by quoting Ed Stetzer, “It’s possible to be a missionary without ever leaving your zip code.” and by writing,

50 Ways to Define “Missional” – VI

Blues Brothers:  On the Missio Dei. Almost inadvertently, I began a series examining the posts from the recent missional synchroblog in which I participated with a total of 50 bloggers (plus a few unofficial entries). Recalling my the missional series from last summer, I’m determined to wrap this one up in fewer words. In any event, we dive into the next batch of submissions for consideration.

Mark Petersen begins with a story, then explains why it is missional, which he defines in ten points:

50 Ways to Define “Missional” – III

Blues Brothers:  On the Missio Dei. Somewhat by accident this week, I started a series examining and interacting with some of the posts from the missional synchroblog in which I participated this week along with 49 other “official” entries and a few unofficial ones. Having already apologized to Paul Simon, today’s set is the “make a new plan, Stan” series.

Cobus Van Wyngaard weighs in by invoking David Bosch’s Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission right in the post title. This is one of the keystone works for understanding missional, so it’s good that somebody brought it into the fray. Leaving the definition to others, he chose to explore the question, “Why the missional church?” Although often credited with the term missio Dei, he writes that “Bosch is simply giving an overview of how the concept has developed since 1932 onwards.”