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The Real Mary

The Real Mary: Why Evangelical Christians Should Embrace the Mother of Jesus The subject of Mary, the mother of Jesus can tend to cause a stir. I’ve heard evangelicals speak with distain about Mariology, which has always bothered me. Gabriel called her “favoured one” and “blessed among women.” You’d think we could show a little respect, even without asking her to make intercession on our behalf. For this reason, I was very pleased to see that Scot McKnight is releasing a book on Mary, The Real Mary: Why Evangelical Christians Should Embrace the Mother of Jesus.

The publisher’s page on the book offers additional information, including the following description of the book:

Mary, the mother of Jesus—who was she, really? What kind of woman would compose a song as powerful as the Magnificat?

The real Mary was an unwed, pregnant teenage girl in first century Palestine whose response to the angel Gabriel shifted the tectonic plates of history. Far from the saccharine caricatures so often seen today, the Mary of the Scriptures was a woman of courage, humility, spirit, resolve and guts. By meeting this Mary, the first disciple and teacher of Jesus, we are brought even closer to her Son.

Interested parties can download a preview, which includes:

  • The Table of Contents
  • Chapter 1: Why a book about the real Mary?
  • Chapter 2: “May it be” Woman of Faith

The book will be released November 1st, and discussions about it will take place in various venues on the weekend of December 3rd. I expect it’ll provide some good reflection fodder for the Advent season this year, but it offers much more besides. As one can see just from the preview material, one of the purposes of the book is to take the real Mary, in her historical context, and understand what we can about her life… gleaning what we can from her example even after she left the stable and the shepherds behind. I was pleased with the idea and general direction of the book when I heard about the project, and given the high calibre of Scot McKnight’s other writings, I was sure it would be insightful when I could eventually get the time to read it. Having read the preview, I’m looking forward to getting it early and sliding it onto my reading list ahead of several other worthy books I have stacked up and waiting. Stay tuned.

5 Responses to “The Real Mary”

  1. Emerging Church Blogs Says:

    be insightful when I could eventually get the time to read it. Having read the preview, I’m looking forward to getting it early and sliding it onto my reading list ahead of several other worthy books I have stacked up and waiting. Stay tuned. by Brother Maynard at September 19, 2006 01:35 AM

  2. Emerging Church Blogs Says:

    be insightful when I could eventually get the time to read it. Having read the preview, I’m looking forward to getting it early and sliding it onto my reading list ahead of several other worthy books I have stacked up and waiting. Stay tuned. by Brother Maynard at September 19, 2006 01:35 AM

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  4. sonja Says:

    I realize, of course, that my quibble is with the publisher … but I cannot let this statement go: “Mary, the mother of Jesus—who was she, really? What kind of woman would compose a song as powerful as the Magnificat?” My guess is that Mary was powerfully influenced by Hannah. Read 1 Samuel 2:1-10 … her song of dedication to the Lord, dedicating Samuel to God and the Temple is clearly reflected in the Magnifcat. We Christians see a far cleaner break between Old Testament and the Gospels than I believe exists. Just some thought fodder … I’m really looking forward to this book too.

  5. Brother Maynard Says:

    Yeah, I think the statement may be a bit baiting for the evangelical set who as you say, can tend to disconnect the Old and New Testaments. Knowing Scot McKnight’s pattern from his earlier Jesus Creed, I expect he will show the OT roots wherever they can be found… and I’m looking forward to that, no doubt!

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